Lesson Plans

Trip Book Lesson Plan 

Tuesday, October 26, 2010 1:02:06 PM
Trip Book
Planning a trip? Create a book with your child about what you are going to do on the trip by drawing pictures, writing, and finding photographs. You can add to the book during the trip and review it at the end of your trip. This activity teaches vocabulary, involves imagination, and increases communication about what to expect.
Language Therapy Idea: Trip Book: Anne Coady M.S., CCC-SLP and Imagine Speech www.imaginespeech.com
Is your client planning a trip? Create a book with your client about what he is going to do on the trip by drawing pictures, writing, and finding photographs. Parents can work with their child by adding to the book during the trip and reviewing it at the end of the trip. Ask your client to return the book, and you can review the main events and details of the trip together.
 
·         Teaches vocabulary.
·         Involves imagination, abstract language concepts, and predictions.
·         Teaches sequencing.
·         Helps teach forming opinions.
·         Opportunity for review of the main events and details.
·         Increases communication about what to expect.
·         Appropriate and fun for a wide age range.
·         Easy to make and transport.
·         Make a copy for your client to take home for additional practice.
 
What you need:
·         Prior discussion with parents about what is planned.
·         Paper to make pages
·         Stapler
·         Pictures or colored pencils to make pictures.
 
 
How to use in therapy:
Depending on your client’s developmental level and fine motor skills, he can draw pictures, glue pictures, or write about the upcoming trip events. On each page, discuss the vocabulary involved in the event, your client’s predictions of the event, and your client’s opinion of the event. After making the book, focus on the sequence of events and teach terms like “first,” “next,” “before,” “after,” “finally,” and “last.”
 
Ask the parents to add to the book and review the book with their child. The book will help your client know what to expect on the trip and may alleviate anxiety.
 
When your client returns, review the book with your client and work on recalling main events and details. Be sure to use lots of positive praise and feedback!

Indirect Language Therapy: Play and Expansions 

Tuesday, October 26, 2010 1:01:58 PM
Indirect Language Play Therapy
by Anne Coady and Imagine Speech www.imaginespeech.com
 
Is your client working on increasing mean length of utterance (MLU)? Repeat what your client says in an expanded form.
·         Teaches vocabulary.
·         Helps increase MLU.
·         Helps teach play skills.
·         Appropriate for preschool children.
·         This activity can be used in a client’s home, a therapy room, a classroom, or outside.
·         This is a great modeling skill for parents and teachers too.
 
 
 
What you need:
·         An appropriate environment for preschool children with toys and activities.
 
 
How to use in therapy:
Follow your client’s lead and engage in a preferred activity. Repeat what your client says back to him in an expanded form. For example, your client points to a tree and says, "Bird on." You can say, "The bird is on the tree." This type of modeling helps children combine more words together. In addition, model appropriate play and social language skills. Remember to give lots of positive praise and feedback!

Back to School Card Game: 

Tuesday, October 26, 2010 1:00:04 PM
Back to School Card Game: Anne Coady M.S., CCC-SLP and Imagine Speech www.imaginespeech.com
It is the beginning of the school year! Do you need a fun way to review goals and take base-line data? Play a game of Uno or another favorite card game. During turns, ask students what their goals are, why the goals are important, what their best strategies are, and where they should use their strategies. Also, leave a few turns to take base-line data, do a final review of goals, and answer questions. This activity gives a wonderful start to the year, since it offers opportunities for fun, review, and base-line data collection. Base-line data will give you an appropriate place to start therapy, and it will let you know if your students regressed, stayed consistent, or improved over the summer!
·         Reviews and teaches goals.
·         Reviews and teaches importance of goals.
·         Reviews and teaches strategies.
·         Base-line data collection.
·         Increases student involvement in the process.
·         Appropriate and fun for a wide age range.
·         Easy to put together and transport.
·         Establishes the therapy-home connection and communication.
 
How to use in therapy:
Choose a card game and alter it to fit the time frame of a speech-language session. Review goals with each student and start the game! During each turn ask students explain what their goals are, why those goals are important, what strategies help them, and where they should use those strategies. Save a few turns to collect base-line data on each goal. Conclude with a short review and lots of positive praise!
 

Establish a therapy-home connection by giving a homework assignment for students to review their goals and strategies with parents and explain to parents why the goals are important.

Articulation Bingo 

Tuesday, October 26, 2010 12:55:45 PM
Artic Bingo
 
Is your child working on correct sound production and articulation? Practice can be fun! Create a bingo board with words that start with the error sound. For example, a /r/ bingo board could have the words run, red, road, etc.... This is a great rainy day activity.
 
Speech Therapy Idea: Articulation Bingo: Anne Coady M.S., CCC-SLP and Imagine Speech www.imaginespeech.com
 
Do you want to make speech-therapy fun and have a lot of targeted responses?  Create bingo boards with words that have targeted sounds. For example, an initial position /r/ bingo board could have the words run, red, road, rake, etc....
 
·         Can use for any sound in initial, medial, and final positions.
·         Can use for single word, phrase, and sentence level objectives.
·         Can use for phonological processes too.
·         Appropriate and fun for a wide age range.
·         Easy to make and transport.
·         Make a copy for your client to take home for additional practice.
 
What you need:
·         Paper to make boards and cards.
·         Pictures or colored pencils to make pictures.
·         Pennies or chips
 
How to play:
You can make the boards and cards ahead of time, or you can make the boards and cards during therapy while practicing targeted sounds.
 
Once the materials are made, your clients practice targeted sounds by naming pictures. They place pennies or chips on the corresponding board pictures. The person to get 5 in a row or complete “black out” wins. Make sure to give lots of positive praise and feedback! Send a copy home for additional practice.